Dating a recovering alcoholic first year nina dobrev dating ian somerhalder interview

Although relationships can be a fun way to pass the time, research shows that they rarely enhance recovery.

Why do relationships in early recovery so often lead to relapse? At a time when emotions are already unstable, a break-up can trigger the kind of anger and despair that used to be assuaged with drugs or alcohol.

They may also find themselves being discharged early for having sex with other clients or being spoken to about dressing provocatively or flirting with the staff.

In some cases, receiving treatment in a men-only or women-only drug rehab helps clients focus on their recovery.

Sex is a natural, healthy part of relationships, but it is also a major cause of relapse among the newly sober.

Any time a particular person or relationship becomes attractive, it is important to ask, “Could this attraction be rooted in my addictive behaviors or underlying issues? ” Early recovery is a time for rigorous honesty and introspection.

In many cases, these relationships are not only distracting and dysfunctional, but they also put both partners at increased risk of relapse. Promiscuity, Affairs or Risky Sexual Behavior If your therapist recommends sexual abstinence for at least the first 90 days of sobriety and you feel like all air has escaped the room, you may be struggling with an underlying love or sex addiction.

An inability to be alone, feeling worthless or unloved when not in a relationship, or a sudden drop in self-esteem brought on by having fewer sexual partners can all point to a deeper issue.

Alcohol and drug use are an accepted (and sometimes expected) part of the dating scene, which can trigger a relapse for even the most resolute.

In addition, the relationships formed in these places are likely “hook-ups” (casual, and perhaps risky, sexual encounters) rather than genuine connections, which can become addictive in and of themselves.

Leave a Reply