Sex chat for teens ages 13 to 18

“I think denying that [sex] is part of our culture in 2014 is really not serving our kids well,” says Lara Calvert-York, president of the Fremont school board, who argues that kids are already seeing hyper-sexualized content—on after school TV.“So, let’s have a frank conversation about what these things are if that’s what the kids need to talk about,” she says.( The average American young person spends over seven hours a day on media devices, often using multiple systems at once.Studies show that more than 75% of primetime TV programs contain sexual content, and the mention of sex on TV can occur up to eight to 10 times in a single hour.Everyone is feeling a little awkward.” But the Fremont parents aren’t budging.“Any good parent monitors what their child has access to,” says Topham.We think it’s a great tool that can greatly benefit a parent’s relationship with their child when it comes to online safety.

Trevor Space is a monitored youth-friendly site where lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth ages 13 to 24 can connect with other young people throughout the world, and can get involved in their local LGBT communities.Their target: a sex-ed book published by Mc Graw Hill.It offers the traditional advice and awkward diagrams plus some considerably more modern tips: a how-to for asking partners if they’ve been tested for STDs, a debate on legalizing prostitution.Most sex games are safe and harmless, but partners need to openly discuss and agree beforehand on what they are comfortable doing.” “I was just astounded,” says Fremont mom Teri Topham. ” But school board members contend that 9 grade students have already been exposed to the contents of the book—and much, much more.They argue that even relatively modern sex ed has even not begun to reckon with what kids are now exposed to in person and online.

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