Updating hardware

We stripped the hardware off of both of the sliding doors in about five minutes (I took one side while John got the other one) by just unscrewing things on the front, back, and side to free them with a regular old philips head screwdriver… So after some decent amount of online research and chatting up the paint pros at Lowe’s (there’s a woman at the one near us who is phenomenally knowledgeable) we learned that the most recommended method for refinishing hardware (to gain the most durability and long-lasting finish) was: So I grabbed my high grit sandpaper and started on the first step: sanding. I should have taken a picture of the one side of the doorknob that I thought I ruined with the dumb sanding step but I was too busy freaking out. The hardware on our sliding doors in the living room looked like this: So as you can probably tell from the photo above (duh) down they came. Some folks weren’t as crusty as others, but they were all well past their prime. The sandpaper left tons of obvious scratches in the gold finish that I knew wouldn’t completely be covered by thin coats of primer and spray paint.Luckily I realized the knob would be installed with that part underneath, so only Clara-height children may be able to see the slightly roughed up texture on the underside. Update: A few smarter-than-me commenters recommended trying steel wool or super high grit automotive sandpaper to rough up the surface, so I plan to try that next time.

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As for the ORB finish: Hi my name is Sherry, and I’m addicted to oil-rubbed bronze. Oh and the total cost of this project was for the spray paint (I was able to return the unopened can of primer and I already had the deglosser and that dastardly sandpaper on hand).

But for someone who needs to purchase deglosser, you might want to budget four more dollars for that.

It still looks like that inside, it’s just seemingly impossible to get it on film. So maybe if you’re a staunch rule follower (and not a freaked out walrus impersonator like me) you could get away with the sanding step. I just didn’t trust myself to do it all in one consistent direction (aka: not make a hot mess that was oh so obvious after the spray-job).

Perhaps the most exciting thing is that in taking this style quiz, the thing that I loved most about the room they said was “my style” was the white door with the dark hardware. Either way, I have high hopes that the deglosser and included-primer will do their job when it comes to adhesion (especially since our old scratched and rusted fixtures weren’t too glossy or shiny to begin with). I could be addicted to sanding things, which would have been a cruel joke since sandpaper was the kryptonite of this project. Has anyone else successfully sanded their metal hardware before spraying it? So in summary, my method was just to: use a liquid deglosser (although I’ll also try steel wool or extra high grit sandpaper next time), lay everything out on cardboard standing up so it could be sprayed evenly from all angles, use a half-inserted key to block any keyholes, spray everything thinly and evenly in 3 coats applied every 20 mins or so, be sure to move toggles and locks so all parts of the hardware were sprayed, and let it cure for about 6 hours before rehanging it.

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